The Story Of Fail Is Made Of Win

Am I the only one who can’t stop laughing at the term fail being dissected in such a technical, journalistic fashion in the New York Times?

In a few years’ time, the use of fail as an interjection caught on to such an extent that particularly egregious objects of ridicule required an even stronger barb: major fail, überfail, massive fail or, most popular of all, epic fail. The intensifying adjectives hinted that fail was becoming a new kind of noun: not simply a synonym for failure but, rather, a derisive label to slap on a miscue that is eminently mockable in its stupidity or wrongheadedness. Online cynics deploy fail as a countable noun (“That’s such a fail!”) and also as a mass noun that treats failure as an abstract quality: the offending party is often said to be full of fail or made of fail.

How Fail Went From Verb to Interjection

There are no comments

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.