And The Award For New Dumbest Fraud That Apparently Actually Works Goes To…

I’m struggling to figure out how this scam works. Not because of its extreme level of sophistication or anything like that, but because try as I might, I can’t imagine a scenario in which even as a naive high school student I could manage to be this much of a maroon.

City police fraud detectives are warning of a scheme in which scammers target high school students offering money for nothing if they hand over their bank card and PIN.
“Peer pressure is used to recruit them as well as the promise of easy money,” the organized fraud unit warned Wednesday.

The suspects approach teens through friends or social media and offer them money in return for the loan of their card. Then they deposit the cash from another fraud into the teen’s account and immediately withdraw it.
The teen victim is then responsible for the withdrawn cash when the bank realizes the deposit was fraudulent.

I need to know so much more about this peer pressure. I realize people can be persuasive especially when you’re young, but how little self-confidence must you have if “come on man, everybody’s doing it” is causing you to cough up your PIN? Don’t give your PIN to anyone is the first thing you learn when you’re given control of a bank account. If it isn’t, you should probably be taken away from whomever is in charge of you.

If the idea is that the scammers are going out of their way to target only the slowest kids, then maybe you’ve got something. But otherwise? Just…no. 🤦‍♂️

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2 Comments

    1. It’s from Ottawa, so close enough.

      I like NIP?  Nope.  Assuming educational campaigns could even work on the sort of person that would fall for this, it’s a decent slogan should they go that route.

      Hmmm.  Would it work if you changed nope to nonpe?

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